Inversion

We use INVERSION in this example to emphasise with NEGATIVE ADVERBS. To do so, we must change the position of the subject and the auxiliary verb. Look at the examples below:

Inversion: Never have I seen so many people.
-Active: I have never seen so many people.

The inversion example is used to emphasise WITH THE NEGATIVE ADVERB POSITIONED AT THE BEGINNING of the sentence, and furthermore, you can see how the position of the subject and auxiliary verb changes, too.

We can also use INVERSION with the Conditionals in English. With the conditionals, the meaning is different since it makes the sentence more formal. Let’s have a look at some of the examples :
First Conditional:

Active: If I need any help, I will let you know.
Inversion: Should I need any help, I will let you know.

See how we replace “if” with “should”, therefore making the sentence more formal. Also, notice how the position of the auxiliary verb (should) and the subject pronoun (I) change.

Second Conditional:

Active: If I went to see my boss today, he would not be pleased with me, so I have decided to avoid him.
Inversion: Were I to see my boss today, he would not be pleased with me, so I have decided to avoid him.

See how we replace “if” with: were + subject + infinitive. As with the First Conditional, this change makes the sentence more formal, but, without any change to the meaning.

Third Conditional:

-Active: If I had known you were here, I would have come sooner.
Inversion: Had I known you were here, I would have come sooner.

See how we replace “if” with: Had + subject + past participle. This change simply makes the sentence more formal, but, without any change to the meaning.

The last example is by far the most commonly used, and it is, of course, when we use: not only. With this example, we want to give our sentence emphasis. Let’s have a look at an example before examining the grammar:

-Not only does she speak English, but also French.

Notice how the first introductory element (the first sentence) is inverted, which makes it complicated for English students because you are using an affirmative sentence to emphasise which, is written interrogatively. However, it is important to remember that it is not a question, but simple inversion. The second element (sentence after the comma) is not inverted, only the first. Let’s have one more example before we finish:

Inversion: Not only are we visiting Big Ben today, but also Buckingham Palace.

We hope you have enjoyed this grammar masterclass. See you next week, here in our blog.

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Utilizamos la INVERSIÓN en el siguiente ejemplo para enfatizar los ADVERBIOS NEGATIVOS. Para hacerlo, debemos cambiar la posición del sujeto y el verbo auxiliar.

Inversión: Never have I seen so many people.

-Activa: I have never seen so many people.

El ejemplo de inversión se usa para enfatizar CON EL ADVERBIO NEGATIVO SITUADO AL PRINCIPIO de la oración, y, además, también podemos observar cómo cambia la posición del sujeto y el verbo auxiliar.


También podemos usar la INVERSIÓN con los condicionales en inglés. Con los condicionales, el significado es diferente ya que hace que la oración sea más formal. Echemos un vistazo a algunos ejemplos:

Primer Condicional:

Activa: If I need any help, I will let you know.

Inversión: Should I need any help, I will let you know.

Observa cómo «if» se reemplaza por «should», por lo que la oración es más formal. Además, mira cómo cambian la posición del verbo auxiliar (should) y el pronombre sujeto (I).

Segundo Condicional:

Activa: If I went to see my boss today, he would not be pleased with me, so I have decided to avoid him.
Inversión: Were I to see my boss today, he would not be pleased with me, so I have decided to avoid him.

Observa cómo reemplazamos «if» por: were + subject + infinitive. Al igual que con el Primer Condicional, este cambio hace que la oración sea más formal, pero sin ningún cambio en el significado.

Tercer Condicional:

-Activa: If I had known you were here, I would have come sooner.

Inversión: Had I known you were here, I would have come sooner.

Observa cómo reemplazamos «if» por: «had»+sujeto+»past participle». Este cambio simplemente hace que la oración sea más formal, pero no cambia el significado.

El último ejemplo es, con mucho, el más utilizado, y es, por supuesto, cuando usamos: «not only». Con este ejemplo, queremos dar énfasis a nuestra oración. Veamos un ejemplo antes de analizar la gramática:

-Not only does she speak English, but also French.

Fíjate cómo se invierte el primer elemento introductorio (la primera frase), lo que lo hace complicado para los estudiantes de inglés porque está usando una oración afirmativa para enfatizar cuál está escrita de manera interrogativa. Sin embargo, es importante recordar que no se trata de una pregunta, sino una de simple inversión. El segundo elemento (la frase después de la coma) no está invertido, solo el primero. Veamos un ejemplo más antes de terminar:

Inversion: Not only are we visiting Big Ben today, but also Buckingham Palace.

Esperamos que hayas disfrutado de esta clase magistral de gramática. Nos vemos la semana que viene aquí, en nuestro blog.

 

17 thoughts on “Inversion

  1. Hola. Buenas!! Me ha encantado este artículo que habéis llegado hasta dar una clarísima explicación sobre «inversion» con los condicionales!!!!!! Pero menudo nivel por dios!! Graciassssssss

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