¿Sabes la diferencia entre: fall, fall down, fall over y fall off?


En cuanto tenemos que hablar en inglés usando los verbos caer y caerse, nos cortamos enseguida por no querer meter la pata. Se nos hace difícil comprender la diferencia y tratamos de buscar una explicación fácil de recordar. Hoy en el blog de Touch English, os lo queremos aclarar de una vez por todas… Veamos unos ejemplos de estos verbos que nos traen tantas complicaciones:

Fall over
Se dice FALL OVER cuando una persona pierde el equilibrio, es decir, pasa de estar vertical a estar horizontal.

-Paul fell over yesterday and broke his nose on the pavement.
-Your baby is always falling over when she tries to walk.
Fall off
Se dice FALL OFF cuando algo o alguien se desprende de algo.

-John fell off the horse again.
-The picture fell off the wall again last night.

Fall down
Se dice FALL DOWN cuando una persona se cae y a la vez, se hace contacto con algo mientras vaya por abajo. Además, se suele decir FALL DOWN cuando un edificio se derrumba.

-The elderly lady fell down the stairs.
-The skier fell down the ski slope and broke his leg.
-The house fell down during the hurricane last night.

Fall
Se dice FALL cuando está relacionado con algo natural o normal bajo la fuerza de la gravedad.

-The rain falls from the sky.
-The leaves always fall in the Autumn.

Si queremos incluir el árbol en la misma frase, hay que decir FALL OFF.

-Most of the leaves fell off the tree yesterday.

Esperamos que se vea claramente la diferencia. Los verbos que acabamos de explicar tienen MUCHOS más significados, pero en este post, queremos que se vea cuáles son las diferencias con los usos MÁS COMUNES, claro.

Un verbo, de la misma familia de FALL que no hemos citado antes es uno de los más complicados para nuestros alumnos, hablamos del verbo FALL OUT. Vamos a ver a continuación cómo se usa en inglés.

Fall out
Se dice FALL OUT cuando dos personas riñen por haber discutido. O cuando a alguien se le está cayendo el pelo.

-They fell out because he was talking to another girl at the party.
-Every time she washes her hair, her hair falls out.

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7 thoughts on “¿Sabes la diferencia entre: fall, fall down, fall over y fall off?


  1. Both Fall out examples are bad to me. They don’t make sense. 1st what did the guys fall out of? second what did the hair fall out of?
    Falling out of a plane or a helicopter sounds better.

    Also you can say Fall through.

    I fell through a window.

    Entiendes?

    • Christopher Duggan

      Hola.
      Vamos a aclarar tus dudas.
      Let’s look at the first example from the post:

      «They fell out because he was talking to another girl at the party». ¿No está claro que el ejemplo va de dos personas que ya no SE HABLAN? El verbo «fall out» en este caso es un «phrasal verb» intransitivo inseparable, por lo tanto, no se pone objeto directo.

      Now, the second example from the post:

      «Every time she washes her hair, her hair falls out». ¿No se nota que se habla del pelo de la cabeza? Y además, y como el ejemplo arriba, el verbo «fall out» en este caso es un «phrasal verb» intransitivo inseparable, por lo tanto, no se pone objeto directo.

      Para terminar, y para que vayas mejorando tu inglés, quiero aclararte algo con una de tus frases de esta mañana: «Both Fall out examples are bad to me». En inglés se dice: «Both examples of «fall out» are not correct».

      Ánimo y que te vaya bien 🙂
      Saludos1

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